CRTC Skinny Basic TV Package Leads to end of Cheaper Deals?

Cable Companies Using New CRTC Skinny Basic TV Package as Way to End Older, Cheaper Packages?

The new CRTC skinny basic TV package which has been attractively positioned at $25 has now led to the demise of cheaper packages that were available earlier.

New CRTC rules, which were created to increase choice and affordability, seem to have paved the way for more expensive deals at Rogers.

Cable provider Rogers stopped its Digital Lite package post the new CRTC rules coming into effect. Rogers, which is following the CRTC instructions to provide the $25 package, previously had cheaper deals for its customers.

The new starter pack, which was unveiled by Rogers, replaced its Digital Lite deal, however it remains noteworthy the channels for the two basic plans are similar and include mandatory Canadian and major US networks. The price however is not similar; the older and now defunct deal was actually cheaper than the new one.

While new customers will have to pay $30.48 every month for the package, the old package provided the package for $16.99 a month and included the SD box.

However, sources claim that Digital Lite was not really available to all customers, it was not advertised and only offered to those who specifically asked for it or those who were unhappy with other packages.

“I personally think the Digital Lite was a great starter package at a super price and hoped that was where Rogers would start with their skinny TV package,” ex-Rogers employee Ron Finnigan told a Canadian news organisation.

The company however claimed that it now offers one ‘light’ package for customers to build on and that the previous cheaper package would not allow users to add on additional popular programming.

With the new pricier deal customers can add on many channels and theme packages, however customers have complained the prices of the add-on options are very high. The company itself seems to suggest its VIP TV package with 372 channels which costs $79.98 a month.

While online streaming seems to be the way for those who had previously taken the cheaper TV package to watch shows, it will be difficult to convince people to sign up for expensive add on packages.